Saturday, January 2, 2016

The Seneca Letters Reading Program

For many years it has been my intention to read through the entirety of Seneca’s Letters to Lucilius. It has be suggested that the Letters are (or can be used) as a Stoic learning program , and this is the inspiration for this plan. Whether the letters are real correspondence or thinly disguised diatribes actually has very little bearing on the richness of the content.

With that, the Seneca Reading Plan starts tomorrow. I have added a section to thestoiclife.org with links to the reading segments.

There are a couple of features that I thought might be important to note.

1 - There are only 5 readings a week. You can do them at any time, any day, all at once or one a day. It's up to you. I recommend that whatever you choose, try to be as consistent as possible. Same time, same place.

2 - There are 52 weeks of readings, divided into Books that correspond with the Books of Seneca's letters. All of the books are contained within whole weeks. Books are divided into 10 readings (2 Weeks), 15 readings (3 weeks) or 20 readings (4 weeks).

3 - No one is quite sure WHY Seneca chose to divide his letters into books, but some suspect that the divisions are thematic. In fact, one author suggests that the letters are actually a Stoic curriculum. With that in mind, keep a notepad and pen handy to make your own observations about what you are getting out of the letters. Whenever we finish up a book, we can meet at the Foundations of Stoic Practice Facebook group and compare notes.

4 - These are the writings of a man. That's it, just some guy, 2000 ish years ago, sharing his perspectives on life and philosophy. They are not scripture, they are aren't infallible, and most especially Seneca was not infallible (which he reminds us of time and time again). Question what you read, debate it, disagree. It's OK. And if you agree, great. The most important thing to remember is that when you do (agree or disagree), be prepared to back it up with why.

5 - If you choose to take on this program, you are doing it for yourself. You don't owe me, or anyone here, a damned thing. You are your own person, and you are free to come and go as you please. That being said, we always expect a level of respect and courtesy in our dealing with each other, and if we do disagree, lets not be disagreeable.

Thanks so much to all of you who have shown an interest in this program, and I am looking forward to hearing your thoughts on Seneca's letters.