Saturday, January 9, 2016

Week 1 - Seneca Letters Reading Plan

Well we have reached the end of Week 1 of the Seneca Letter Reading Plan. In this week, Pam and I have read Letters I - V together. Each morning, over our coffee and cereal, we take turns reading and discussing the letter of the day. I have been making massive notes in my copy of the Letters, writing and underlining with abandon.

The notes range from observations to themes. The most important notes are to myself, reminders of ways in which I can improve my own life. To be clear, just because Seneca said it doesn't mean that I believe it! Everything is challenged, everything is put to the test.

I am not a Stoic because I have subscribed to a creed passed down through guru to priest to anointed messenger. There are no Stoic saints, saviours, or even sages. Just men (unfortunately, no women - a great loss) who wrote what they had learned of life and how to live it. Now I was just trying to match their experiences to mine, and see if they could teach me anything.

This week, Seneca has. It was all about that limited commodity, really the only thing that is truly mine. Time. The first letter was all about how we waste it, how we fritter it away in pointless pursuits, or in his own words "while we are doing that which is not to the purpose." [I.1] What the purpose that we SHOULD be working towards remains to be seen. He ends with a dire warning that waiting too long to regulate our time would leave us with too little left to make a difference.

Before going on, I wanted to pause here. One of the things that I love about the Stoics is their bracing honesty. No golden gates, endless opportunities for forgiveness and or rebirth to get it 'right' next time. This is it. Waste this opportunity and it's gone. Some mistakes, misdeeds and vicious acts are irretrievable. Time passes, and you lose every opportunity that you don't take. There may be more opportunities later, but it will never be the same one.

Time only moves in one direction. Everything behind us is already in the hands of death [I.2], and worrying too much about what stretches before us is merely the result of  "a mind that is fretted." [V.8] The only time that matters is now, the present and what we do with it. [V.9] One of Seneca's recurring themes in these early letters is the focus on THIS day, and how we "reckon" it's worth. [I.2] He starts out by instructing us to "lay hold of today's tasks," Those daily tasks include continued studies in order to acquire some new philosophical fortification, [II.4] which we in turn must put into practice to make ourselves better. [V.1] Every day we should think about the length of our lives [IV.5],  that we are dying daily [I.2] and what we should do with the one day we have.

One of the biggest challenges to this focus is where to find the time to study [I.4], and to practice. Letters II - V dispense with time-wasters and objections. Don't know where to focus your studies? Read Letter 2. Pulled in too many directions by social obligations to fair-weather friends? Read Letter 3. Worried about the future? Read Letter 4. Spending your time on getting or getting rid of things? How you look? How your home looks? Read Letter 5. Time is suddenly yours in spades.

This is just the beginning though. Book I has seven more letters, and two more weeks. I am looking forward to seeing if my understanding so far holds up. In the meantime, I have some reading to do.