Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Stoicism: Life Hack vs. Life Style

It is becoming trendy to be Stoic, cool to be cool in the face of turbulence and trouble, a hacker of the ultimate computer: the human mind.

Articles about Stoicism are being published in nearly every major newspaper, in large part due to its most well known popularizers, Tim Ferris and Ryan Holiday. They are not the first to speak about Stoicism or to offer their take on 'Stoic Tips and Tricks,' nor will they be the last. The message, though, is pretty much the same: have the life you've always wanted, without all of the pain of living. It is the easy street to serenity.

But why now? Stoicism, as a philosophy, is over 2300 years old. Granted, there was a quiet period where other voices took center stage, and still hold sway. The continual publishing of Seneca and the rediscovery of Marcus Aurelius (from a single document!), as well as the more recent translation of Musonius Rufus, not to mention the perennial favourite Stoic among Stoics, Epictetus, have all in their way subtly influenced western society. But this notoriety, this interest, this is new.

Why? Perhaps, as many have pointed out, Stoicism is a philosophy for troubled times. The proliferation of media coverage of disaster and destruction in every arena of life has given some the impression that these are terrible times indeed. People in pain seek a relief, and Stoicism seems to offer tricks to take the mind off the big questions.

"Don't worry about things you can't control, and there really isn't much you can control anyway."

"Life is long, if you know the trick to making it so."

"Don't let your emotions get the better of you."

"Stop reading about being a good person, and just be one."

All good advice. Really. It is. But is reducing Stoicism to fortune cookie aphorisms really the cure? Or, like so many "Make your life better in six easy lessons" movements, this one is doomed to failure by its own superficiality.

Approaching Stoicism as a life hack is, if anything, treating the symptom. Stoicism as a life STYLE is about searching out the cause and effecting a deep change. As Seneca said, Stoicism is not meant for mere improvement, but for transformation.

I don't worry about things not under my control, because through careful reflection (and much painful failure) I have learned what control is, and how pitifully little I have of it. But I have also learned that though I simply don't HAVE to have control over everything, everything is still under control.

Life IS long, if by long you mean today, this hour, this moment. If you learn to embrace death, yours and of everyone you hold dear. If you practice dying, daily. Then, and only then, can each moment be fully lived, and more life can be squeezed into a gaze into the eyes of your loved one than in eons of merely being alive.

My emotions are things I have, not what I am. They are an expression of my thoughts, of my thinking patterns, of my beliefs about the universe and my place in it. I don't seek to suppress my so-called negative emotions, I seek instead to align my life with a truer understanding of reality.

I CAN become a good person, a better person than I currently am, approaching the ineffable sage who represents my very best self. But first, I have to understand what 'good' means, and good in what way, and good for what. I have to plumb the depths of my own frailty and failure to seek the lofty heights of goodness.

Finally, life hacks, in and of themselves, seek to make the person more successful. Stoicism, as a lifestyle, seeks to make a person more human.